Category Archives: Travel Projects

Antarctica from your Armchair with Penguin Watch

Penguins in the wild of Antarctica recorded by scientists

They call it Armchair Penguinology: studying 200,000 photos of 30+ penguin colonies in Antarctica and recording their movements. Scientists from Oxford University collected the images but don’t have the manpower to sort through them all, so that’s where you and I come in.

By signing up for the Penguin Watch project on the Zooniverse website, you can classify photos and mark up the adults, chicks, eggs and other animals appearing on your screen. With numbers of penguins declining, scientists are desperate to pinpoint why, and it’s hoped this study will throw up some suggestions by monitoring breeding patterns and behaviour.

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I’ve Been Somewhere Secret…

Part of being a blogger is having the freedom to legitimately over-share many aspects of your life, essentially brandishing a megaphone and yelling about what you’ve done, where you’ve been, and what you think about the issues of the day, with the enthusiasm of a small child.

Under that umbrella of over-sharing, telling you about my latest trips (whether you want to hear about them or not) makes up a large part of my travel blog, adding a sense of immediacy once I return to my laptop and a secure internet connection. Yet last week I went on a secret solo trip abroad, and I’m not sure when I will be allowed to talk about it fully.

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Someone Once Told Me – A Global Project

Yesterday, whilst at a Travel Massive meet-up,  I took part in what can only be described as an awesome photo project which is set to go viral. The brainchild of Mario Cacciottolo, a BBC journalist based in London, Someone Once Told Me has a simple aim: to document those words of wisdom (or anger, or affection) that have stayed with you and been etched into your brain. Having six years of experience under his belt, Mario is a great photographer with an eye for detail, but he admits it wasn’t always this effortless. “When I first started, I had this really old camera from communist Germany and I didn’t even know what an aperture was,” he says candidly. He soon learned the ropes, posting one photo a day on his website for five years, which built a huge back-catalogue of personal experiences and memories brought to life under the lens.

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