Tag Archives: Excellent Adventures

Mudlarking About: Thames Beachcombing with London Walks

Beachcombing as mudlarks along the river in London

“Ah – it seems you’ve found a bit of old sewage pipe,” says Fiona. Perhaps not what you want to hear when you’re seeking buried treasure along the Thames foreshore. Luckily this doesn’t come after hours of searching – Fiona, an inter-tidal archaeologist, is talking to an amateur mudlark, who laughs and heads off to continue scouring the shoreline for more unknown treasures (or unsavoury bits of piping) during the last few minutes of a Thames Beachcombing Walk. This is their idea of fun on a Saturday morning, and it’s contagious, so I’ve come to find out more.

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Visit The Family Travel Show for Half Price

Parents and young children walking on the sand next to the sea

When I was a child, family holidays involved picnics and windbreaks, intensive AA map reading and taking a punt on whether a hotel would be anything like the brochure suggested. Today’s families are so much better informed and really do have the world at their fingertips, with parenting blogs, specialist magazines, in-car SatNavs and travel review sites to help them plan adventures. However, with so much choice, making decisions can be just as tricky.

That’s where The Family Travel Show comes in – it’s the first consumer event designed just for families, providing hands-on advice and talks. Here’s what to expect, and how to save 50% on the price of your tickets (you’re welcome!).

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Water Sports to Try in the UK (Whatever Your Ability)

Watergate Bay North Cornwall surfing area with tourists on the beach

Just in time for long summer days and the approach of the school holidays, guest poster Robyn is here to tell you about three of the best UK water sports to get involved in, whether you’re a complete amateur or you want to test your existing skills in a new location.

Whilst I went white water rafting years ago, and failed dramatically at windsurfing on a school trip, this blog post has reminded me there’s no age limit when it comes to trying water sports. Maybe it’s time to book those surf lessons after all…

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Competition: 6 Friends Theory with Mercure Hotels

Friends splashing in the sea at sunset. Credit: Mercure

On Friday I was part of a group of bloggers introduced to a new competition by Mercure Hotels, which aims to put the ‘six degrees of separation’ theory into practice. The theory, developed in 1929, says that everyone can be connected to everyone else on the planet by only six stages of communication or fewer. At the launch event we tested our social media skills with some blogger challenges, and soon realised how easily we could connect with strangers from all over the world, helped by the hashtag #6FriendsTheory.

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Competition: Win a Pair of Tickets to the Adventure Travel Show!

Adventure Travel Show 2015 exploring the world

Calling all travel addicts: who fancies a weekend packed with famous explorers and leading tour operators giving you insider tips and inspiring you to book your next big voyage? Yep, thought you might be tempted…

The Adventure Travel Show will take you off the beaten track, introducing you to unique experiences, including trekking holidays, eco-friendly breaks, volunteering opportunities and wildlife tours. You’ll be able to learn about remote places and plan your own incredible journeys along the way. Now in its 19th year, the show comes to Olympia London on 17th and 18th January 2015 and is an unmissable event for anyone who wants to explore more of the world.

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Majestic Peru with Intrepid: Trip Review, Part 3

incan buildings at popular South American tourist attraction

We’d already stayed in Puno, seen the male knitters of Taquile Island, and had our introduction to the crafty building skills of the Incas; now it was time for the final push to Machu Picchu on our Majestic Peru tour (if you need a quick recap, click back to Part 1 and Part 2).

Day 11 – Ollantaytambo to Aguas Calientes

Whilst we didn’t have time to trek up to the higher narrow terraces in the mountains, we got to visit the lower ones, just a short walk away from the town centre in the Archaeological Park. I then popped into the Museo de Chocolate (Chocolate Museum) to refuel, before watching some colourful street processions. Lunch was at the Hearts Cafe, a local business and charity supporting women in highland communities facing issues like nutritional problems or domestic violence.

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Majestic Peru with Intrepid: Trip Review, Part 2

Floating Islands reed houses and local family

The mid-point of this trip was all about the altitude and the brilliant views that came along with it. As with the previous days, we veered between exploring urban streets and quiet backwaters, topped off by some time on the water. Here’s the abbreviated version of what we got up to (and for Part 1, click here).

Day 6 – Arequipa to Puno

It felt as though we left Arequipa and the Hotel Asturias a little too soon, and I would have liked to spend more time getting to know the city. However, we were back on the road again and heading for Puno, on the shores of Lake Titicaca – this time a six hour journey. With frequent stops for coca tea and vicuña spotting, we eased ourselves into the higher altitude, albeit nursing headaches, nausea and dizziness between us.

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Majestic Peru with Intrepid: Trip Review, Part 1

Wildlife sign on the road in Peru

Peru is undoubtedly one of the most engaging countries I’ve visited. I may have only spent just over a fortnight there, but I managed to pack so much into every day that I don’t feel short-changed. What’s more, I got to meet fellow travellers from around the world and discover the country with them.

If, like me, you can’t afford to spend months here but you’d like to really get to know what Peruvian culture and history involves, guided by experts, you might be tempted by the trip I booked – Majestic Peru, with Intrepid Travel. Knowing how important peer reviews are when picking a specialist tour operator, I’ve broken down my review into three stages so you can get a clear idea of what to expect.

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Destination Validation: When Have You Really ‘Been There’?

Country stamps of travel

A recent article in the British travel press saw a freelance writer taking her baby daughter along with her around the world. It’s an admirable move and incidentally gives the girl some amazing bragging rights when she grows up, but it made me wonder: could that baby, when an adult, really say she has experienced these countries if she only has photos, and no memories, to rely on?

Whilst the article was about the logistics of working parent duties rather than said bragging rights, it spurred me into thinking about the many different ways we measure ‘doing’ a country or a destination. Just Google ‘travel blog + country counting’ and you’ll see there are plenty of people out there with a tally to monitor. There’s even a prestigious Travelers’ Century Club (American spelling) for those who’ve reached the precious 100 milestone. So, for everyday adventurers not indicted into any club, what could potentially be considered as a valid tick from the list?

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Chichester Festival Theatre’s first Live Night: A Glimpse behind the Glitz of Amadeus

Theatrical props waiting in the wings at Chichester, designed by Lizzie Frankl

Lonely Planet describes the Chichester Festival Theatre (CFT) as ‘somewhat Soviet-looking’. However, the interior is definitely bang up to date, thanks to a £22 million renovation project affecting every part of the inner space, from the snazzy trap door in the stage to the 100 extra seats and the distinctive ceiling art in the cafe.

I took a free tour of the new layout, as part of the first Live Night, a special event aimed at theatregoers aged 16-25, which took place shortly before the evening’s performance of Amadeus.

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