Tag Archives: History

More to Malta: Sailing and Sightseeing in the Mediterranean

Historic buildings and fort in Valletta, Malta, with yachts and sea view

I don’t often include guest posts on the blog, but I couldn’t resist this one. Like me, Jennifer Wolfe has fallen for Malta and its islands, and she knows you can see even more of them from the water. If you’ve never been, prepare to be tempted now…

Although it’s becoming more popular with UK travellers, Malta still isn’t as widely known as it should be. The islands of Malta, Gozo and Comino retain the feel of an out-of-the-way place, dense with history and echoes of the various cultures from conquerors over the years, and they deserve to be discovered.

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A Brief History of Portugal, from the Old Man on Tram 15

Mosteiro dos Jeronimos Hieronymites Architecture in Lisbon with Gothic archways and stonework

At the back of the tram carriage heading from central Lisbon to Belém, a little old man hovers, clad in stone-coloured trousers, sensible shoes and a thick green coat, despite the stifling July heat. I offer him my seat, but he refuses, insisting he’s happy to stand.

“Where are you from?” He asks, as we follow a sweeping curve in the tram tracks. England, I say. Near London. He’s never visited but knows all the highlights.

A proud Lisboeta, he admits there isn’t a lot to see en route until we reach Belém itself. “However,” he says, pointing at a blur of buildings behind a pastel wall, “that was the colonial hospital, where they treated tropical diseases.”

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Testing the Three Day Official Dublin Pass

Ha'penny bridge spanning the River Liffey with hotels and shops on one side

I recently blogged about the Freedom Pass from Dublin Sightseeing, but my city break also involved another sightseeing card (yes, I like to spread my favours): the Dublin Pass, which gives tourists free entry to 33 leading attractions.

Adult prices vary from €39 (£29) for one day or €61 (£45) for six days’ access. My three day option cost €71 (£52), which worked out at €23.66 (£17.33) per day, and I was determined to see as much as possible during that time.

So what sealed the deal? As with my Freedom Pass experience, the convenience factor is one big incentive: carrying less cash saves time. With the Dublin Pass you get a free one-way Aircoach transfer, and you can skip the line at some of the city’s most popular sights. To get your attraction tickets, the staff scan your pass using a mobile app. Here’s my verdict…

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Writing Reykjavík: Literature and the Iceland Writers Retreat

Iceland Geological plate site of Thingvellir and Althing historic parliament area beside lakes

Langt síðan við höfum sést means ‘long time no see’ in Icelandic; in 2016 it’ll be three years since I visited Iceland, so that phrase feels quite fitting. I don’t know where the three intervening years have gone, but I do know I spent a good portion of that time waxing lyrical about the other-worldly landscapes and the witty Reykjavík street art. The people were genuinely the friendliest I’ve ever met – for example, cashiers were rarely bothered about me paying the correct amount, a tour bus driver gave me an impromptu crash course in bird spotting, and fellow pub-goers sat down for a chat with genuine curiosity and warmth.

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Jack the Ripper Museum: A Cultural Controversy

East End London map with locations marked.Credit: Jack-the-ripper-walk.co.uk

I’ve seen couples posing for romantic photos at the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, and children use it as a playground, leaving sweet wrappers behind; I’ve seen bored teenagers struggling to feign interest at Sachsenhausen concentration camp. In those cases it was the visitors, not the attractions, lacking emotional intelligence and leaving me speechless.

London’s Jack the Ripper Museum, in the heart of Whitechapel, has gone one step further in terms of emotional intelligence failures, by actively encouraging tourists to mock murder victims. The appalling serial killings of Victorian prostitutes are offered as the perfect subject for a selfie or two this Halloween weekend. A recent press release, publicising the museum as a Halloween attraction, suggests visitors take “a selfie with the serial killer” (or, at least, a mysterious bloke in a top hat). Fancy “a picture with Jack in Mitre Square together with the body of Catherine Eddowes”? Go ahead. It’s not like Eddowes can complain, right?

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Sightseeing in Dublin with the Freedom Pass

Sightseeing green bus on Merrion Square in city centre

Dublin is mostly a walkable city and, though you can navigate it easily, there are always extra things to be seen from the road and from the experts. When I visited last week for a short break with my parents, I knew a bus tour would be on our agenda, but we wanted to get the best value for our Euro.

I chose Dublin Sightseeing’s Freedom Pass as it seemed like good value for money: €33 (or £24) provides three days’ unlimited hop-on hop-off bus travel on two sightseeing routes, plus public bus travel (the blue and yellow buses you see everywhere), a free Pat Liddy walking tour and free entry to the Little Museum of Dublin, alongside a range of attraction discounts. Not bad for the equivalent of €11 (£8) per day. But would it be useful in reality?

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Mudlarking About: Thames Beachcombing with London Walks

Beachcombing as mudlarks along the river in London

“Ah – it seems you’ve found a bit of old sewage pipe,” says Fiona. Perhaps not what you want to hear when you’re seeking buried treasure along the Thames foreshore. Luckily this doesn’t come after hours of searching – Fiona, an inter-tidal archaeologist, is talking to an amateur mudlark, who laughs and heads off to continue scouring the shoreline for more unknown treasures (or unsavoury bits of piping) during the last few minutes of a Thames Beachcombing Walk. This is their idea of fun on a Saturday morning, and it’s contagious, so I’ve come to find out more.

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Louis Vuitton Series 3 Exhibition: In Fashion for the Long Haul

Classic Vuitton monogram symbols including fashion brand logo

A Louis Vuitton trunk at the airport speaks volumes about its owner. For one thing, they’re probably not bothered about excess baggage charges (no fear of Ryanair restrictions here). For another, they probably won’t buy three copies of The Daily Telegraph in WHSmith just to get the free giant bottles of Buxton water for the flight and the onward journey. And they won’t have a dilemma about whether it’s ok to nick the blankets from the plane on long haul flights or not, because they don’t fly economy.

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Sussex Sightseeing: Places You Need to Visit

Brighton burned out pier and beach at dusk

When I’m busy writing about far-flung city breaks or adventures abroad, I forget to shout about the sights on my doorstep here in Sussex. It’s high time this was resolved, especially as East and West Sussex have some really unusual attractions that need to be in the spotlight. From an Indian-inspired pavilion to a 15th century Chaucer text, these unique locations are certainly worth your time.

Arundel

It started life as a small Saxon village, but today Arundel is a busy town, dwarfed by a cathedral and a huge castle that’s nearly 1,000 years old. Just along from the castle, you can hire a rowing boat at Swanbourne Lake, before checking out the Blackfriars ruins as you head back to the main streets.

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Istanbul: A Safety Guide for Solo Female Travellers

Bosphorus boat ride at sunset across two continents

Time for my first blog takeover! Guest blogger Hanna, from Italy, is here to give you her tips on travelling alone as a woman in Istanbul.

Regular readers may remember I’ve written about solo travel in New York and going solo in Prague, so it was great to get Hanna’s perspective on visiting Istanbul – a city that spans two continents and has its own Women’s Library promoting the history of women in Turkey (somewhere for the bucket list)…

When word got out about my plans to travel to Istanbul, I was flooded with the usual objections and warnings from people I knew, especially as I’m a lone female. Yet Istanbul was perhaps one of the most memorable trips I’ve ever taken, despite the stereotypical image of the country as being unsafe.

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