Tag Archives: Photography

Pics or It Didn’t Happen: On Losing Travel Photos

Camera on desk credit Markus Spiske via Pixabay

There are plenty of #firstworldproblems travellers encounter, but one of the most frustrating once you’ve returned from your trip is the case of the missing photos. Our digital dependency means we upload these images, maybe back them up to an external device or cloud, then return to them at will, rarely holding a physical copy.

Such was the case with my New York city break last year: four nights of exploring one of my all-time favourite cities, with my parents and former NY resident sister. My photos, spread across two cameras and a smartphone (yes, I’m that gadget-dependent), captured the key moments from our visit: taking in the disturbing but unmissable 9/11 Museum; stumbling upon the Brooklyn Historical Society on Pierrepont Street, and its heart-breaking slavery exhibition. Browsing cute little shops like The Fountain Pen Hospital and Fishs Eddy [sic], and trying out cool restaurants, like Bareburger; walking the High Line and the Brooklyn Bridge.

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Jack the Ripper Museum: A Cultural Controversy

East End London map with locations marked.Credit: Jack-the-ripper-walk.co.uk

I’ve seen couples posing for romantic photos at the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, and children use it as a playground, leaving sweet wrappers behind; I’ve seen bored teenagers struggling to feign interest at Sachsenhausen concentration camp. In those cases it was the visitors, not the attractions, lacking emotional intelligence and leaving me speechless.

London’s Jack the Ripper Museum, in the heart of Whitechapel, has gone one step further in terms of emotional intelligence failures, by actively encouraging tourists to mock murder victims. The appalling serial killings of Victorian prostitutes are offered as the perfect subject for a selfie or two this Halloween weekend. A recent press release, publicising the museum as a Halloween attraction, suggests visitors take “a selfie with the serial killer” (or, at least, a mysterious bloke in a top hat). Fancy “a picture with Jack in Mitre Square together with the body of Catherine Eddowes”? Go ahead. It’s not like Eddowes can complain, right?

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How to Improve Your Travel Photography (Even at Beginner Level)

Blue water and colourful boats in Peru with mountain backdrop

People say memories are one of the best things you can bring back from a trip, but I’m willing to bet photos come a close second for most of us. However, it can be a challenge to get a beautiful shot when you’re far from being a pro.

The good news is, it doesn’t take long to build confidence and ability behind the camera. Start getting to grips with photography now and you’ll be able to put your skills to the test when you’re next on the road.

Basic Beginner Tips

Think about composition. What story are you trying to tell in your picture, and what do you want to include or exclude from it? Move away from putting your subject in the centre all the time, and get to know the rule of thirds: imagine your screen divided into thirds each way (nine little squares) then have the subject intersecting the points where some of those squares meet.

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Destination Irrelevant: The Rise of the Self-Absorbed Holiday

Thai island landscape with selfie pose (photo of woman: credit wn.com)

It’s fair to say we’re in the grip of a selfie epidemic. Not only has the National Gallery’s newly relaxed photography policy potentially unleashed a tidal wave of idiots standing in front of (and deliberately obscuring) world-renowned artworks, but there’s also the queen of selfies, Kim Kardashian, taking things one step further. It’s been reported that Kim K took a mind-bending 1,200 selfies in a single day during a holiday in Thailand this summer.

Now we can admit we’re not safe from pouting posers in the shadows of a city gallery or on a sun-bleached Thai beach, perhaps it’s time we all acknowledged the growing trend of the self-absorbed holiday. You know, the one where the background is fairly immaterial, an all-inclusive resort or a luxury yacht is hungrily booked up and the tourist doesn’t actually have to tour anything. They might venture out on a very occasional excursion, but it will mainly be an exercise in creating photo opportunities (starring themselves) and trying not to engage with anyone who doesn’t speak impeccable English.

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Antarctica from your Armchair with Penguin Watch

Penguins in the wild of Antarctica recorded by scientists

They call it Armchair Penguinology: studying 200,000 photos of 30+ penguin colonies in Antarctica and recording their movements. Scientists from Oxford University collected the images but don’t have the manpower to sort through them all, so that’s where you and I come in.

By signing up for the Penguin Watch project on the Zooniverse website, you can classify photos and mark up the adults, chicks, eggs and other animals appearing on your screen. With numbers of penguins declining, scientists are desperate to pinpoint why, and it’s hoped this study will throw up some suggestions by monitoring breeding patterns and behaviour.

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Horst: A Global Photographer

Perspolis Persia image of bull and palace 1950

Think a fashion photographer has nothing to do with travel? Think again. A new exhibition at the V&A pays tribute to one of the best international photographers of the 20th century, known for his eye-catching fashion images such as Mainbocher Corset (1939), but with a wealth of travel experience under his belt too.

The German-born artist known as Horst P. Horst mainly split his time between the hectic cities of Paris and New York and managed to squeeze in quite a few breathtaking escapades during his 93 years. Here are some of the geographical highlights of Horst: Photographer of Style

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Why it’s not ok to whip out your iPad in the Colosseum and at Machu Picchu

One of the greatest bugbears of modern travelling, for me at least, is the sight of an ignorant tourist whipping out their iPad to document a world-famous landmark. The combination of stupidity and arrogance is enough to make my blood boil, as they ditch the prospect of using a camera or, God forbid, their eyes, to record memories.

Such is my loathing, I figured it was time to take a closer look at why this is so offensive and what you should be doing instead, to look a bit less obvious if nothing else. I’ve taken two prominent locations as examples – in each one I’ve spotted people freely using this gadget to a worrying degree…

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Why Travel Bloggers Would Love London Fashion Week

London Fashion Week models posing

There’s something about watching photogenic fashion tribes that conjures up a David Attenborough or Bruce Parry voice-over inside my head. Something that says I’m in the presence of a species fundamentally different to my own, no matter how much I might want to understand them or imitate them. Ultimately there’s a little bit of fear in not knowing what their next move might be, or whether they’re about to bare their claws. Welcome to London Fashion Week, where the beautiful and the strange gather.

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Photo Essay: Bristol’s Graffiti Scene

You don’t need to be a fan of street art to enjoy Bristol, but it helps. In the homeland of the mysterious Banksy, who inadvertently brought graffiti chic to the masses (by way of the mechandisers who made money out of reproducing his designs), it’s only right that there should be a focus on the city walls as a canvas.

As some of these photos reveal, I spent a lot of time in Nelson Street, which – as I’ve recently discovered – is home to Britain’s largest street art project, called See No Evil. This project involved 72 artists from around the world contributing graffiti, which is permanently displayed here.

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Street Art in Rome

Give me a great bit of street art and I’m a happy bunny. I know that Rome doesn’t have the same kind of gritty urban reputation as New York or London, but it’s actually a great place to find some unexpected gems on a wall or in a shop window, in between checking out ancient ruins (which I’m glad haven’t been covered in spray paint, but have more subtle additions).

Here are some of the best examples that I could find during my visit, from bizarre animals to a religious art interpretation.

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